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Blessed Unrest Beach Bag

$36.00
  • Blessed Unrest Beach Bag
  • Blessed Unrest Beach Bag
  • Blessed Unrest Beach Bag
  • Blessed Unrest Beach Bag
  • Blessed Unrest Beach Bag
  • Blessed Unrest Beach Bag

Hit the beach with blessed unrest!

Ready to have fun in the sun? Put your stuff in a bag that will:

  • Refuel your passion,
  • Rekindle your courage,
  • Renew your hope for the world you know is possible.

Quality or crap?

You are in luck! This is quality. Let’s face it: You probably don’t “NEED” this bag. So if you’re going to support independent music by buying this, it might as well be AWESOME.

  • 100% polyester fabric
  • Carries a LOT of stuff (max weight limit is 44lbs / 20kg)!
  • Large inside pocket
  • Comfortable cotton webbing handles
  • Vibrant colors that won't fade
IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS
  • Sand castles will crumble if stored in this bag.
  • Do not rub bag all over body as substitute for sunscreen.
  • You just ate — don't go swimming yet!

Before the bag, there was... the song! 

 

 

A note from Zo

About the artwork

This beautiful design was created by my friend Molly McLeod (https://mollymcleod.com), an incredibly talented artist, designer, and coach.

When we put our heads together to make this, we realized we wanted this piece of art to do exactly what I wrote the song “Blessed Unrest” to do: Help us remember who we are, what matters to us, and the world we know is possible.

Right away, Molly came up with the concept of a candle and flame, held in the palm of someone’s hand. But it REALLY took off when she realized it wasn’t just about one person holding the candle — it was about ALL of us, helping each other to keep our flames burning bright.

In the end, that’s really what this piece is all about: We need each other to keep the fire alive. We DEPEND on each other. We are INTERDEPENDENT WITH each other!

About the song

“Blessed Unrest” is a prayer, and a call, to a particular way of being: Awake to the world as it is, devoted to the world as it could be, and engaged in bridging the gap.

Credit for the phrase “blessed unrest” goes to the dancer Martha Graham, for whom it describes a state of sacred discontent at the heart of every creative act. She said: “There is a vitality, a life force, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique…. There is only a queer divine dissatisfaction; a blessed unrest that keeps us marching…”

I learned the phrase through The Pachamama Alliance, whose transformational education program, Awakening the Dreamer, uses it to name the way of being our world needs from us. There’s a fierce urgency, but also a deep, boundless joy — even an equanimity from knowing you are doing what you’re here to do.

Paul Hawken uses the phrase for the title of his book, “Blessed Unrest,” in which he catalogues the incredible number of community and nongovernmental organizations working worldwide to advance social justice and environmental sustainability. These groups make up what he calls “the largest social movement in history,” an unprecedented collective “immune response” to the outdated paradigms and ideologies that have given rise to so much ecological damage and suffering to life on this planet.

Blessed Unrest Beach Bag

$36.00

Blessed Unrest Beach Bag

$36.00

Description

Hit the beach with blessed unrest!

Ready to have fun in the sun? Put your stuff in a bag that will:

  • Refuel your passion,
  • Rekindle your courage,
  • Renew your hope for the world you know is possible.

Quality or crap?

You are in luck! This is quality. Let’s face it: You probably don’t “NEED” this bag. So if you’re going to support independent music by buying this, it might as well be AWESOME.

  • 100% polyester fabric
  • Carries a LOT of stuff (max weight limit is 44lbs / 20kg)!
  • Large inside pocket
  • Comfortable cotton webbing handles
  • Vibrant colors that won't fade
IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS
  • Sand castles will crumble if stored in this bag.
  • Do not rub bag all over body as substitute for sunscreen.
  • You just ate — don't go swimming yet!

Before the bag, there was... the song! 

 

 

A note from Zo

About the artwork

This beautiful design was created by my friend Molly McLeod (https://mollymcleod.com), an incredibly talented artist, designer, and coach.

When we put our heads together to make this, we realized we wanted this piece of art to do exactly what I wrote the song “Blessed Unrest” to do: Help us remember who we are, what matters to us, and the world we know is possible.

Right away, Molly came up with the concept of a candle and flame, held in the palm of someone’s hand. But it REALLY took off when she realized it wasn’t just about one person holding the candle — it was about ALL of us, helping each other to keep our flames burning bright.

In the end, that’s really what this piece is all about: We need each other to keep the fire alive. We DEPEND on each other. We are INTERDEPENDENT WITH each other!

About the song

“Blessed Unrest” is a prayer, and a call, to a particular way of being: Awake to the world as it is, devoted to the world as it could be, and engaged in bridging the gap.

Credit for the phrase “blessed unrest” goes to the dancer Martha Graham, for whom it describes a state of sacred discontent at the heart of every creative act. She said: “There is a vitality, a life force, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique…. There is only a queer divine dissatisfaction; a blessed unrest that keeps us marching…”

I learned the phrase through The Pachamama Alliance, whose transformational education program, Awakening the Dreamer, uses it to name the way of being our world needs from us. There’s a fierce urgency, but also a deep, boundless joy — even an equanimity from knowing you are doing what you’re here to do.

Paul Hawken uses the phrase for the title of his book, “Blessed Unrest,” in which he catalogues the incredible number of community and nongovernmental organizations working worldwide to advance social justice and environmental sustainability. These groups make up what he calls “the largest social movement in history,” an unprecedented collective “immune response” to the outdated paradigms and ideologies that have given rise to so much ecological damage and suffering to life on this planet.